G20 protests: Inside a labour march

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G20 protests: Inside a labour march
Wikinews accredited reporter Killing Vector traveled to the G-20 2009 summit protests in London with a group of protesters. This is his personal account.

Friday, April 3, 2009

London – “Protest”, says Ross Saunders, “is basically theatre”.

It’s seven a.m. and I’m on a mini-bus heading east on the M4 motorway from Cardiff toward London. I’m riding with seventeen members of the Cardiff Socialist Party, of which Saunders is branch secretary for the Cardiff West branch; they’re going to participate in a march that’s part of the protests against the G-20 meeting.

Before we boarded the minibus Saunders made a speech outlining the reasons for the march. He said they were “fighting for jobs for young people, fighting for free education, fighting for our share of the wealth, which we create.” His anger is directed at the government’s response to the economic downturn: “Now that the recession is underway, they’ve been trying to shoulder more of the burden onto the people, and onto the young people…they’re expecting us to pay for it.” He compared the protest to the Jarrow March and to the miners’ strikes which were hugely influential in the history of the British labour movement. The people assembled, though, aren’t miners or industrial workers — they’re university students or recent graduates, and the march they’re going to participate in is the Youth Fight For Jobs.

The Socialist Party was formerly part of the Labour Party, which has ruled the United Kingdom since 1997 and remains a member of the Socialist International. On the bus, Saunders and some of his cohorts — they occasionally, especially the older members, address each other as “comrade” — explains their view on how the split with Labour came about. As the Third Way became the dominant voice in the Labour Party, culminating with the replacement of Neil Kinnock with Tony Blair as party leader, the Socialist cadre became increasingly disaffected. “There used to be democratic structures, political meetings” within the party, they say. The branch meetings still exist but “now, they passed a resolution calling for renationalisation of the railways, and they [the party leadership] just ignored it.” They claim that the disaffection with New Labour has caused the party to lose “half its membership” and that people are seeking alternatives. Since the economic crisis began, Cardiff West’s membership has doubled, to 25 members, and the RMT has organized itself as a political movement running candidates in the 2009 EU Parliament election. The right-wing British National Party or BNP is making gains as well, though.

Talk on the bus is mostly political and the news of yesterday’s violence at the G-20 demonstrations, where a bank was stormed by protesters and 87 were arrested, is thick in the air. One member comments on the invasion of a RBS building in which phone lines were cut and furniture was destroyed: “It’s not very constructive but it does make you smile.” Another, reading about developments at the conference which have set France and Germany opposing the UK and the United States, says sardonically, “we’re going to stop all the squabbles — they’re going to unite against us. That’s what happens.” She recounts how, in her native Sweden during the Second World War, a national unity government was formed among all major parties, and Swedish communists were interned in camps, while Nazi-leaning parties were left unmolested.

In London around 11am the march assembles on Camberwell Green. About 250 people are here, from many parts of Britain; I meet marchers from Newcastle, Manchester, Leicester, and especially organized-labor stronghold Sheffield. The sky is grey but the atmosphere is convivial; five members of London’s Metropolitan Police are present, and they’re all smiling. Most marchers are young, some as young as high school age, but a few are older; some teachers, including members of the Lewisham and Sheffield chapters of the National Union of Teachers, are carrying banners in support of their students.

Gordon Brown’s a Tory/He wears a Tory hat/And when he saw our uni fees/He said ‘I’ll double that!’

Stewards hand out sheets of paper with the words to call-and-response chants on them. Some are youth-oriented and education-oriented, like the jaunty “Gordon Brown‘s a Tory/He wears a Tory hat/And when he saw our uni fees/He said ‘I’ll double that!'” (sung to the tune of the Lonnie Donegan song “My Old Man’s a Dustman“); but many are standbys of organized labour, including the infamous “workers of the world, unite!“. It also outlines the goals of the protest, as “demands”: “The right to a decent job for all, with a living wage of at least £8 and hour. No to cheap labour apprenticeships! for all apprenticeships to pay at least the minimum wage, with a job guaranteed at the end. No to university fees. support the campaign to defeat fees.” Another steward with a megaphone and a bright red t-shirt talks the assembled protesters through the basics of call-and-response chanting.

Finally the march gets underway, traveling through the London boroughs of Camberwell and Southwark. Along the route of the march more police follow along, escorting and guiding the march and watching it carefully, while a police van with flashing lights clears the route in front of it. On the surface the atmosphere is enthusiastic, but everyone freezes for a second as a siren is heard behind them; it turns out to be a passing ambulance.

Crossing Southwark Bridge, the march enters the City of London, the comparably small but dense area containing London’s financial and economic heart. Although one recipient of the protesters’ anger is the Bank of England, the march does not stop in the City, only passing through the streets by the London Exchange. Tourists on buses and businessmen in pinstripe suits record snippets of the march on their mobile phones as it passes them; as it goes past a branch of HSBC the employees gather at the glass store front and watch nervously. The time in the City is brief; rather than continue into the very centre of London the march turns east and, passing the Tower of London, proceeds into the poor, largely immigrant neighbourhoods of the Tower Hamlets.

The sun has come out, and the spirits of the protesters have remained high. But few people, only occasional faces at windows in the blocks of apartments, are here to see the march and it is in Wapping High Street that I hear my first complaint from the marchers. Peter, a steward, complains that the police have taken the march off its original route and onto back streets where “there’s nobody to protest to”. I ask how he feels about the possibility of violence, noting the incidents the day before, and he replies that it was “justified aggression”. “We don’t condone it but people have only got certain limitations.”

There’s nobody to protest to!

A policeman I ask is very polite but noncommittal about the change in route. “The students are getting the message out”, he says, so there’s no problem. “Everyone’s very well behaved” in his assessment and the atmosphere is “very positive”. Another protestor, a sign-carrying university student from Sheffield, half-heartedly returns the compliment: today, she says, “the police have been surprisingly unridiculous.”

The march pauses just before it enters Cable Street. Here, in 1936, was the site of the Battle of Cable Street, and the march leader, addressing the protesters through her megaphone, marks the moment. She draws a parallel between the British Union of Fascists of the 1930s and the much smaller BNP today, and as the protesters follow the East London street their chant becomes “The BNP tell racist lies/We fight back and organise!”

In Victoria Park — “The People’s Park” as it was sometimes known — the march stops for lunch. The trade unions of East London have organized and paid for a lunch of hamburgers, hot dogs, french fries and tea, and, picnic-style, the marchers enjoy their meals as organized labor veterans give brief speeches about industrial actions from a small raised platform.

A demonstration is always a means to and end.

During the rally I have the opportunity to speak with Neil Cafferky, a Galway-born Londoner and the London organizer of the Youth Fight For Jobs march. I ask him first about why, despite being surrounded by red banners and quotes from Karl Marx, I haven’t once heard the word “communism” used all day. He explains that, while he considers himself a Marxist and a Trotskyist, the word communism has negative connotations that would “act as a barrier” to getting people involved: the Socialist Party wants to avoid the discussion of its position on the USSR and disassociate itself from Stalinism. What the Socialists favor, he says, is “democratic planned production” with “the working class, the youths brought into the heart of decision making.”

On the subject of the police’s re-routing of the march, he says the new route is actually the synthesis of two proposals. Originally the march was to have gone from Camberwell Green to the Houses of Parliament, then across the sites of the 2012 Olympics and finally to the ExCel Centre. The police, meanwhile, wanted there to be no march at all.

The Metropolitan Police had argued that, with only 650 trained traffic officers on the force and most of those providing security at the ExCel Centre itself, there simply wasn’t the manpower available to close main streets, so a route along back streets was necessary if the march was to go ahead at all. Cafferky is sceptical of the police explanation. “It’s all very well having concern for health and safety,” he responds. “Our concern is using planning to block protest.”

He accuses the police and the government of having used legal, bureaucratic and even violent means to block protests. Talking about marches having to defend themselves, he says “if the police set out with the intention of assaulting marches then violence is unavoidable.” He says the police have been known to insert “provocateurs” into marches, which have to be isolated. He also asserts the right of marches to defend themselves when attacked, although this “must be done in a disciplined manner”.

He says he wasn’t present at yesterday’s demonstrations and so can’t comment on the accusations of violence against police. But, he says, there is often provocative behavior on both sides. Rather than reject violence outright, Cafferky argues that there needs to be “clear political understanding of the role of violence” and calls it “counter-productive”.

Demonstration overall, though, he says, is always a useful tool, although “a demonstration is always a means to an end” rather than an end in itself. He mentions other ongoing industrial actions such as the occupation of the Visteon plant in Enfield; 200 fired workers at the factory have been occupying the plant since April 1, and states the solidarity between the youth marchers and the industrial workers.

I also speak briefly with members of the International Bolshevik Tendency, a small group of left-wing activists who have brought some signs to the rally. The Bolsheviks say that, like the Socialists, they’re Trotskyists, but have differences with them on the idea of organization; the International Bolshevik Tendency believes that control of the party representing the working class should be less democratic and instead be in the hands of a team of experts in history and politics. Relations between the two groups are “chilly”, says one.

At 2:30 the march resumes. Rather than proceeding to the ExCel Centre itself, though, it makes its way to a station of London’s Docklands Light Railway; on the way, several of East London’s school-aged youths join the march, and on reaching Canning Town the group is some 300 strong. Proceeding on foot through the borough, the Youth Fight For Jobs reaches the protest site outside the G-20 meeting.

It’s impossible to legally get too close to the conference itself. Police are guarding every approach, and have formed a double cordon between the protest area and the route that motorcades take into and out of the conference venue. Most are un-armed, in the tradition of London police; only a few even carry truncheons. Closer to the building, though, a few machine gun-armed riot police are present, standing out sharply in their black uniforms against the high-visibility yellow vests of the Metropolitan Police. The G-20 conference itself, which started a few hours before the march began, is already winding down, and about a thousand protesters are present.

I see three large groups: the Youth Fight For Jobs avoids going into the center of the protest area, instead staying in their own group at the admonition of the stewards and listening to a series of guest speakers who tell them about current industrial actions and the organization of the Youth Fight’s upcoming rally at UCL. A second group carries the Ogaden National Liberation Front‘s flag and is campaigning for recognition of an autonomous homeland in eastern Ethiopia. Others protesting the Ethiopian government make up the third group; waving old Ethiopian flags, including the Lion of Judah standard of emperor Haile Selassie, they demand that foreign aid to Ethiopia be tied to democratization in that country: “No recovery without democracy”.

A set of abandoned signs tied to bollards indicate that the CND has been here, but has already gone home; they were demanding the abandonment of nuclear weapons. But apart from a handful of individuals with handmade, cardboard signs I see no groups addressing the G-20 meeting itself, other than the Youth Fight For Jobs’ slogans concerning the bailout. But when a motorcade passes, catcalls and jeers are heard.

It’s now 5pm and, after four hours of driving, five hours marching and one hour at the G-20, Cardiff’s Socialists are returning home. I board the bus with them and, navigating slowly through the snarled London traffic, we listen to BBC Radio 4. The news is reporting on the closure of the G-20 conference; while they take time out to mention that Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper delayed the traditional group photograph of the G-20’s world leaders because “he was on the loo“, no mention is made of today’s protests. Those listening in the bus are disappointed by the lack of coverage.

Most people on the return trip are tired. Many sleep. Others read the latest issue of The Socialist, the Socialist Party’s newspaper. Mia quietly sings “The Internationale” in Swedish.

Due to the traffic, the journey back to Cardiff will be even longer than the journey to London. Over the objections of a few of its members, the South Welsh participants in the Youth Fight For Jobs stop at a McDonald’s before returning to the M4 and home.

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Why To Choose A Mobile Auto Repair Mechanic}

Submitted by: Shan Le

To keep pace with the fast moving world that is today, we are largely dependent on our automobiles. The need for personal transportation has reached such a height that a car has evolved from an item of luxury to one of necessity.

Now, like all other machines, even the car is prone to the occasional malfunctioning and might need to be serviced. On a day when you might have had an important meeting or an important place to visit, finding out that your car is not taking a start in the morning can jeopardize all your plans. But given our busy schedules, we often find it very difficult to make out time to take our vehicle to an auto repair shop and even more, it puts us in a position of great inconvenience when the shop decides to keep the car for a few days for the repair.

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At such times, we wonder how helpful it would be if an auto mechanic could come to our home and get the car repaired without us having to take it to the shop or even worse, asking a tow truck to tow it to the shop. This is also true when your car gives out on the way to some place or say, in a remote location which does not have an auto repair shop nearby. In such cases it is very handy to have the contact number of a mobile auto repair mechanic whom you can call and give your location so that you can wait for him to arrive and do the necessary repair work and then you can drive back home.

Apart from this, the mobile auto repair service also gives certain other benefits as well. With a mobile auto mechanic, you can save come precious time as you dont have to drive to and from the shop and also, the mechanic can come down to your home and fix your car so that you dont have to go without your car. Without a fixed establishment, these mechanic work out of their cars and dont have to pay rent for the shops.

Hence they also charge much less for your automobile repair than what an auto repair shop would charge, not to mention the additional charges at the repair shop for storing your vehicle as well as the towing charges in case your car needs to be towed to the shop. But the low cost of repair does not mean that there are any shortcomings in the service that these mechanics provide.

They provide a wide range of services, from the minor repairs like changing of the engine oil, gearbox issues, problems with the air pump, the carburetor, starters, valves etc, or even major issues with the engine or the transmission system. Another advantage of hiring a mobile mechanic is that you develop a certain rapport with him and in case of an emergency, you know whom to call and he will be present to help you out with the situation.

Hence, without any further ado, get a mobile auto repair mechanic for your automobile as soon as you can.

About the Author: For more information on Car Repair in Las Vegas

autorepairoflasvegas.com

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Filed under: Cars

News briefs: February 20, 2014

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News briefs: February 20, 2014

Friday, February 21, 2014

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Electric vehicles can be less green than classic fuel cars, Norwegian study finds

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Electric vehicles can be less green than classic fuel cars, Norwegian study finds

Sunday, October 7, 2012

A Norwegian University of Science and Technology study released Thursday found electric vehicles have a potential for higher eco-toxicity and greenhouse impact than conventional cars. The study includes an examination of the electric car’s life cycle as a whole rather than a study of the electric car’s environmental impact during the use phase.

The researchers conducted a comparison of the environmental impact of electric cars in view of different ratios of green-to-fuel electricity energy sources. In the case of mostly coal- or oil-based electricity supply, electric cars are disadvantageous compared to classic diesel cars with the greenhouse effect impact being up to two times larger.

The researchers found that in Europe, electric cars pose a “10% to 24% decrease in global warming potential (GWP) relative to conventional diesel or gasoline vehicles”.

The researchers suggest to improve eco-friendliness of electric vehicles by “reducing vehicle production supply chain impacts and promoting clean electricity sources in decision making regarding electricity infrastructure” and using the electric cars for a longer time, so that the use phase plays a more important role in the electric vehicle life cycle.

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Toyota accused of misleading public over recalls

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Toyota accused of misleading public over recalls
Published by
Jul 10

Tuesday, February 23, 2010

Toyota has been accused by a U.S. House of Representatives committee with misleading the public and investigators over its recent recalls.

The accusations, in a statement from the House Energy and Commerce Committee, claim that Toyota both relied on a flawed study in its assessment of the issue of sticking accelerator pedals at the heart of the recalls, and then made misleading statements about its response. According to the authors of the letter, Henry Waxman and Bart Stupak, Toyota dismissed, rather than investigated, the idea that the cars’ computers were at fault. In a statement, James Lentz, the president of Toyota’s American division, claimed that hardware issues were to blame, and that dealers were repairing the faulty part. Toyota also released a study commissioned from the research firm Exponent that said electronic systems were not to blame.

According to the House committee, however, the study involved only six vehicles, none of which had problems with their electrical systems, and was insufficient to produce an accurate result. “Our preliminary assessment is that Toyota resisted the possibility that electronic defects could cause safety concerns, relied on a flawed engineering report and made misleading public statements concerning the adequacy of recent recalls to address the risk of sudden unintended acceleration.”

The company is under a criminal investigation, and has received two subpoenas for documents from two House committees relating to the recalls, although whether they are directly related to the letter is unclear. The documents are related to accelerator issues in several models, as well as brake problems with the Prius hybrid car, and were served earlier in in February by a federal grand jury and the Securities and Exchange Commission. Toyota has released upwards of 75,000 pages of documents under the requests.

In a separate, though related, development, it has emerged that Toyota last year negotiated a limited recall for two models, the Toyota Camry and Lexus ES, that were affected by the accelerator recalls, saving the company an estimated $100 million. A confidential internal presentation in July 2009 made the claim, and a month later, a Lexus ES, one of the models under the limited recall crashed in California, killing four people. The claims apparently referenced a September, 2007 recall of floor mats that could trap gas pedals, the same problem that triggered a full recall of numerous Toyota cars to fix the same problem. In the same presentation, the company claimed to have avoided recalls of another model related to rust, as well as delaying new federal safety regulations.

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Wusthof Chef Knife}

Published by
Jul 07

Wusthof Chef Knife

by

shawn parker

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Other than his hands, a chef’s knife is the single most important tool in a cook’s kitchen. A Wusthof Chef Knife is the best there is. Crafted from high quality steel and forged from a single piece of metal that runs full tang in every one of their knives, Wusthof does not compromise. World class chefs in Europe, Asia and the United States insist on nothing less than the best and Wusthof knives can be found in the best hotels and restaurants throughout the world.

At 6 inch, 8 inch and 10 inch, these classic knives do the bulk of all kitchen work and in a pinch can be used to do almost any kitchen task that requires a knife. It is the most important and should be the first knife any serious or casual cook ought to own. Too many kitchens are without the proper tools. If you have no other, this knife will be the one item that you should have.

A Wusthof Chef Knife is precision engineered and crafted to last longer than a lifetime. When properly cared for it will work as well when it is 50 as it does when it is new. The weight and balance of each knife is such that the chef can wield it with confidence, assured that the knife will feel right in his or her palm and when preparing meat and vegetables. The hardened stainless steel blade will hold an edge far longer than carbon steel and can be quickly honed with a steel to keep it at its slicing and cutting best.

The strength and durability of the blades and handles are without peer. With a choice of classic and modern styling, each Wusthof Knife Set is designed to be the same exacting instrument that will satisfy a royal chef or a casual hobbyist. The finest tools in a trade are usually prohibitively expensive…how many violinists can afford a Stradivarius? The Wusthof Chef knife makes the best tools of the trade available to everyone. If you cook now or plan to cook in the future, you ought to have a chef knife.

As you can see, there are severald different styles of Wusthoff Kives. If your in the market for a Wusthoff Knife Set come stop buy!

Article Source:

eArticlesOnline.com

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Filed under: Stainless Steel Fabrication

Final US manufacturer ceases production of lethal injection drug; executions delayed

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Final US manufacturer ceases production of lethal injection drug; executions delayed
Published by
Jul 07

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

The sole United States manufacturer of a key component of lethal injections announced Friday that it will cease production of the drug, contributing to shortages and delaying executions.

Sodium thiopental, the first of a three drug cocktail used in 34 states to render the prisoner to be executed unconscious, was manufactured in Italy until Italian authorities stated that they would only license the manufacture if it was used for medical purposes and not, crucially, for executions.

In a statement, the company, Hospira, said that they have never condoned the use of their drug, marketed as ‘Pentothal’, in executions, and that they could not “prevent the drug from being diverted to departments of corrections for use in capital punishment procedures”.

The move means that the United States is without a viable supplier for sodium thiopental. Although many European countries manufacture the drug, which is primarily used in Europe as an anæsthetic, no manufacturer has been found that is willing to supply it for use in conjunction with the death penalty, the abolition of which has been lobbied by the EU since 2008.

The shortage means that executions in California and Oklahoma have been delayed, with Texas’ last remaining stocks of the drug due to expire in March, weeks before two scheduled executions. These delays are likely to be prolonged as the legal process of drawing up new drugs to be used for injections is lengthy. Pentobarbital, an alternative which used at the Dignitas clinic in Switzerland, is used for lethal injections in Oregon, and has started to be used by Oklahoma.

Hospira’s decision caused mixed reactions throughout the medical community, with the American Society of Anesthesiologists stating Monday that sodium thiopental is an “important and medically necessary anesthetic agent” that is a “first-line anesthetic in many cases”, citing geriatric and cardiovascular conditions, among others. It said that, although they disagree with the death penalty, “we also do not condone using the issue as the basis to place undue burdens on the distribution of this critical drug to the United States. It is an unfortunate irony that many more lives will be lost or put in jeopardy as a result of not having the drug available for its legitimate medical use.”

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Steel Industry: Tata buys Corus

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Steel Industry: Tata buys Corus
Published by
Jul 07

Wednesday, January 31, 2007

India‘s steelmaker Tata Steel, of the Tata Group, buys Anglo-Dutch steel giant Corus Group for £6.7 billion ($12 billion), making it the world’s fifth largest steel manufacturer. 70-year-old Tata group Chairman Ratan Tata, from one of India’s best-known business families, won the race against Benjamin Steinbruch, 52, a famous Brazilian executive who is the chief and main owner of Companhia Siderurgica Nacional (CSN). Tata paid investors 608 pence a share, whereas the Brazilians final offer in an auction by the U.K.’s Takeover Panel was 603 pence.

The deal triples Tata Steel’s capacity to almost 28 million tons a year. Tata: “This is the first step in showing that Indian industry can step outside its shores into an international market place as a global player.”

Corus, which was created from the merger of British Steel and Hoogovens, currently employs 47,300 people worldwide. Last year the company was the ninth-largest steel maker worldwide.

The takeover may start a round of consolidation in the fragmented steel sector.

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Steelmaker Corus to cut 2000 jobs in the UK and Netherlands

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Steelmaker Corus to cut 2000 jobs in the UK and Netherlands
Published by
Jul 07

Thursday, June 25, 2009

Corus, the fifth largest steelmaker in the world, is set to cut 2000 jobs in both the United Kingdom and The Netherlands. 123 jobs are reported to be going in the Netherlands with the remainder from the United Kingdom. Corus have blamed the move on the “further deterioration” of the demand for steel in both the United States and Europe.

Corus Chief Executive Kirby Adams stated, “Any recovery in Europe appears to be some time off”. He added that Corus have to achieve “long-term sustainable competitiveness in a global and over-supplied steel market”. In January of this year Corus cut approximately 3,500 staff worldwide; 2,500 of them in Britain.

Peter Hogg, a commercial director at Corus, reported that the company was surprised at the extent of the global recession. He added that it is clear a full recovery is years away.

Some plants have been hit harder than others. Scunthorpe will lose 500 members of staff, with 379 going at Stocksbridge and 377 at Rotherham. Corus will also reduce operations at Hartlepool, Skinningrove and their Teesside Beam Mill, in Cleveland, where an additional 2,000 already face redundancy. A total of 11 plants in the United Kingdom are affected.

Elliot Morley, Labour Member of Parliament for Scunthorpe, told the BBC that he was disappointed with the job cuts and said he had previously told Corus that they should be a last resort. He added that this was a “sad day” for Scunthorpe.

The Community union general secretary Michael Leahy said that it was “devastating news” and spoke of his concerns for the integrity of the British steel industry.

Corus has the second largest steelmaking operation in Europe. The company was bought in 1999 by Tata Steel, part of India’s Tata Group. The company has around 50,000 employees worldwide.

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Top Ten Pilot Training School Compare And Choose The Best}

Published by
Jul 06

Top ten Pilot training schoolCompare and choose the best

by

HM Aviation

Flying a plane is more than awe-inspiring. It seems extremely exciting and thrilling to watch a metallic bird flying high above. It is apparent for many people to think of flying an airplane. However, not many are able to turn this dream into reality. In the recent years, opportunities for pilots have witnessed new high. An increasing number of airlines are consequential to this rise in demand of pilots. Although you might come across plenty of aviation schools, it is suggested that you compare top ten pilot training schools and make a well-informed decision. You can find out about most popular schools online.

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Most flight training schools teach all aspects related to this promising profession including flying for the freight and military delivery. However, most people who wish to become pilots want to work with commercial airlines. If you are one of those individuals who have no medical conditions which impose limitations from flying planes, finding a job as commercial pilot is possible. With the easy availability of flight stimulators, aspiring pilots get the firsthand experience of how flying in sky would be. It is almost close to reality experience on the ground. When you learn from the simulator, it brings ease when you actually fly.

Being able to progress form the flight simulator and confident to an extent that you can fly plane for practice would still need you an amount of time prior you can receive the qualification you are looking for. Good and reputed flight training schools make sure that training courses are designed in such a way that they coincide with the time learner is done with the needed training hours so that he or she can fly without any supervision. The training which is needed can be done at the local centres with some being owned by airlines whereas others are independently operated.

Owing to the importance and popularity of flight training, a large number of flight schools have mushroomed all over the country. For those who are serious about craving out a niche as pilot should make sure that they look for the aviation academy which is being managed and run by industry professionals. Make sure that you do not get swayed by fancy advertisements and attractive interiors. There are several other important factors which contribute to a promising and right flight training academy. Instead of making a decision on the basis of fake promises and tall claims, look for factors which really matter.

You can ask the aviation academy about the details of previous candidates where are they working now? Browse through their website and sites to learn about the reviews and feedback of others who have completed aviation training. Find out about the experience and skills of the trainers as this would be making a huge difference to your overall flight training process. HM Aviation is one of the top ten pilot training schools in India striving to groom and hone the skills of aspiring pilots to perfection.

HM Aviation

is counted among the

top ten pilot training schools in India

. Aspiring pilots are trained by industry experienced and expert professionals.

Article Source:

eArticlesOnline.com }

Filed under: Transport Logistics